Exempt vs. Nonexempt from Overtime

who is nonexempt 300x198 Exempt vs. Nonexempt from Overtime Exempt vs. nonexempt. What exactly does that mean? Exemption laws vary by state, so the exempt vs. nonexempt question may depend on which state you live in. There are also federal law exemptions, which may or may not be applicable in your state, which further compounds the exempt vs. nonexempt question. In California, where we practice, there are the standard exemptions (the professional exemption, the executive exemption, and the administrative exemption) and a few miscellaneous exemptions (the outside salesperson exemption, the inside sales exemption, computer software engineers, high-level nurses, and more). Federal law has the standard exemptions too (the professional exemption, the executive exemption, and the administrative exemption), and California law turns to Federal law for guidance on how to apply its exemptions to these categories of employees.

Confused yet? This site is meant to help clear up the confusion behind the exempt vs. nonexempt question. Explore our pages dedicated to each of the exemptions under state and federal law. Please bear with us as we build out the site. We are starting with California and hope to add information about the exempt vs. nonexempt laws in each state in the country, along with federal law.

Exempt vs. nonexempt? Typically, “Exempt” means that an employee is not entitled to overtime pay, while “Nonexempt” means that an employee must be paid overtime wages. Learn more about the difference between being exempt vs. nonexempt.

Begin your exploration of overtime exemption laws by clicking on the links below:

California Overtime Exemptions